log management

Determining Peak EPS Calculations in Logging

Much of the challenge in sizing and planning Centralized Log Management (CLM) and Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) solutions is determining an adequate amount of storage for storing logs for real-time analysis and archiving the log data to meet long-term retention requirements. The biggest challenge most customers face is determining the required metrics needed in sizing a solution. My post “Basic Log Storage Calculations” http://www.buzzcircuit.com/?p=208 can assist in the sizing and variables needed and my post “Guessing Game – Planning & Sizing SIEM Based on EPS” http://www.buzzcircuit.com/?p=231 can help with guessing the EPS averages for each device types. Finally, I have a couple of cool calculators at http://www.buzzcircuit.com/?p=408 and http://www.buzzcircuit.com/?p=378 that can actually assist with the final calculations.

At this point you have probably guessed that log storage calculations and storage planning is somewhat of an art, rather than a science – there’s a lot of guesswork involved, especially if you don’t have access to the systems or network devices hosting the logs. While I have done a good job (I think) in helping you dispel some of the myths and “guesstimating” an overall log capacity in previous posts, one area that is often overlooked in planning log management or SIEM is the concept of Normal EPS (NE) vs Peak EPS (PE) and ensuring your daily calculation provide a necessary contingency for consistent peaks in your event logging throughout the day.

Normal vs Peak Logging

There are two basic calculations when combining normal + peak EPS, which by no means is a hard rule. The idea is that their is the NUMBER_OF_PEAKS multiplied by the DURATION_OF_EACH_PEAK, which is then multiplied by the DEVIATION_FACTOR. To describe each of these points:
  • NUMBER_OF_PEAKS: calculating Peak EPS (PE) is required to factor in Normal EPS with Peaks (expressed as NE+PE) to ensure their is sufficient licensing and storage to accommodate periods of deviation from the normal EPS throughout the day. The default in the calculator below assumes there will be at least 3 peaks a day (morning logins, lunchtime web surfing, evening logoffs/backups). This value will vary based on network throttling, congestion, attacks, etc.
  • DURATION_OF_EACH_PEAK: This setting works in conjunction with the previous PE setting and assumes that each peak lasts for approximately 1 hour (3600 seconds) – this may vary given many factors such as how congested the network is, how busy the logging device is or other scenarios such as DDoS attacks.
  • DEVIATION_FACTOR: is generally 2-5x the average EPS for that period. While in reality the EPS spikes almost 20x the average EPS for only seconds, we are building in contingency for attacks such as perimeter devices under DDoS or excessive IT Operational errors that go unnoticed for hours.  NOTE: again, this is an art, not a science and we’ll sound like we know more than our competitors if we think to include contingency into our calculations!

Hope you enjoy!

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NetCerebral’s Device EPS Calculator

Hi folks, this post is another form I created using the Calculated Fields Form plugin for WordPress. Basically, this simple form calculates the number of devices input in the form fields and multiplies the number of devices by the designated Events Per Second (EPS) average for each device type. It then provides a live calculation of total number of devices, total average EPS and total average Events Per Day (EPD).

This handy calculation can then be used on my other calculator NetCerebral’s Simple Log Storage Calculator as the average EPS, need as the primary input to calculate amount of storage and IOPs required for the EPD and retention periods defined.

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NetCerebral’s Simple Log Storage Calculator

The following form assumes you have done the preliminary math of determining your number of devices and the total anticipated Events Per Second (EPS) you will be collecting from all of your logging devices. The calculator uses EPS to determine the Events Per Day (EPD), amount of raw and normalized log data you will generate daily and then use retention and compression values you set to determine the required amount of storage as well as IOPs required.

Stay tuned and I will be building another calculator that will allow you to specify number of devices by device type, which will give you your estimated EPS (needed as a starting point for this calculator).

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Basic Log Storage Calculations

Determining the sizes of log management systems requires knowledge of the number of devices being monitored and the anticipated event rates for each class of system. In many customer engagements, Professional Services time may be required to measure the event rate calculations from all of the monitored devices. This is important since there are too many variables to predict the average or peak Events Per Day (EPS) of any given system. I would caution any customer that if the vendor they are working with gives them “magic” calculations and pricing without gathering the necessary information regarding customer-specific speeds and feeds, they can expect to spend a lot more money later once the vendor gets their foot in the door. Basically, poor planning will result in unavoidable OP/EX costs later.

EPS is one metric used by many log management and SIEM vendors to determine such factors as licensing, storage and peak system loads. Another variable used could be Events Per Day (EPD), especially when it relates to storage sizing and license enforcement. This is why it’s imperative that accurate device counts and product types are audited when planning a centralized log management or SIEM solution.

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Some Generic SIEM Requirements to Ponder

Being tasked with selecting a Security Information and Event Management (SIEM) tool for your organization can be a bit overwhelming. I’ve been there and chosen poorly (in my last life)! The questions you need to ask the SIEM vendor you are buying from are limitless as every customer’s needs are different and the business drivers range from “check-box” compliance to actual enterprise incident handling and response.

Numerous customers have approached me with what they thought were straight Log Management (LM) requirements, since they have only ever had the luxury of manual log review using the “Grep”, “Awk”, “Sed” approach or “spreadsheet Kung Fu”, while others have the budget and want to “boil the oceans”. There are hurdles with both approaches, while the former may be the way to “grow” into a mature concept such as a SIEM tool and the latter will never be outgrown.

In fact, before you can perform real-time analysis on all of the logs to detect threats as they occur, you need to capture all of the event data from the plethora of heterogenous event sources and store the logs in a centralized location. Therefore, I believe log management is an essential part of SIEM because, with the right tool, 100% of your logs are readily available with automated archiving and retention. Additionally, since you have mandated all of the logs from the various technologies to be sent to your central facility, the teams that manage the devices will need an easy-to-use tool that will allow them to do their day-to-day tasks such as troubleshooting network issues, application development debugging, long-term investigations and possibly the last six months of an employees activity for HR or litigation purposes.

Regardless, you should have a strong command of what it is you need SIEM for and use vehicles such as Request For Information (RFI) or Request For Proposal (RFP) to rate each vendor on the top mandatory requirements vs. the “nice-to-have’s”. For this purpose, I have compiled a list of questions that you may determine to be useful when creating your vendor ratings criteria. Here are what I believe to be essential 70+ requirements for the ultimate SIEM and Log Management tool:

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